REVIEW: The King’s Speech

When God couldn’t save The King, The Queen turned to someone who could



After the abdication of his brother, George – ‘Bertie’ – (Firth) must assume the throne. Suffering from a fear induced stammer, he considers himself not worthy of the throne. With help from his loving wife (Carter) Bertie gets help from an unorthodox speech therapist Lionel Logue (Rush). Through his unusual techniques, Bertie is able to find his voice and lead the country through war – as well as creating a life long friendship.



Films associated with royalty has become very popular with successes such as The Queen and Elizabeth, but The King’s Speech blows them all out the water. Based on the inspiring true story of King George VI, one that was kept quiet for so many years.
It is beautiful. It seems that Helena Bonham Carter was born to play The Queen Mother. Her wonderful clipped English is perfect (and such a drastic change from Bellatrix in Harry Potter!) and suits her superbly.
But Colin Firth is the star. To go from a well spoken Englishman to a stuttering royal takes some doing and Firth pulls it off effortlessly. He shows pressure of having a constant struggle to control the stammer allowing us to sympathise and really warm to him. It is easy to see why Firth has received so many nominations for this award, and he thoroughly deserves to win them all.
This isn’t just a film about a stutter, however. Geoffrey Rush as the Australian speech therapist adds a comic injection into an otherwise serious film. Together, this brilliant threesome succeed creating a film that will not only be a box-office smash but will also become a classic in time. A thoroughly inspiring film which will be a major award winner and will go on to become a classic.






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